america-wakiewakie:

Americans Don’t Actually Know Who They’re Bombing | YouGov
There is a great deal of confusion as to where, exactly, the US is conducting air and drone strikes, though the public does tend to support ongoing campaigns
On Tuesday this week the Pentagon revealed that it had launched air and drone strikes aimed at killing the head of the Somali Islamist group al-Shabaab, Ahmed Abdi Godane. While it is still unclear whether the operation was successful, it does not mark a major shift in US policy, which has seen the US launch attacks on al-Shabaab in Somalia before. US military action in Somalia is ongoing alongside the the US presence in Afghanistan, the continued drone strikes in Yemen and Pakistan and the recent decision to begin bombing ISIS militants in Iraq. 
YouGov’s latest research shows that many Americans are confused about where, exactly, the US is bombing. Most Americans are aware of the ongoing campaign in Iraq, and people tend to be aware of the strikes in Afghanistan. Less than a quarter of the public are aware that the US has recently launched strikes in Somalia, Pakistan or Yemen. 30% also say, incorrectly, that the US has recently conducted bombings in Syria and only 32% of Americans know that the US has not in fact launched air or drone strikes in Syria. 
Most Americans support conducting air or drone strikes in Iraq (60%), Afghanistan (54%) and Syria (51%). They also tend to support the ongoing drone campaigns in Somalia (45%), Pakistan (45%) and Yemen (38%). They would also tend to approve (38%) rather than disapprove (33%) of conducting drone strikes in Iran. 29% of Americans say that they would approve of the US bombing Gaza and Ukraine. 
The most recent use of US force in Iraq saw American firepower used to assist Iraqi, Kurdish and Shia forces in their offensive against ISIS to lift the siege of Amerli, a town populated by minority Turkmen. 
Full poll results can be found here. (Photo Credit: Screenshot from Lee Camps Redacted Tonight)

america-wakiewakie:

Americans Don’t Actually Know Who They’re Bombing | YouGov

There is a great deal of confusion as to where, exactly, the US is conducting air and drone strikes, though the public does tend to support ongoing campaigns

On Tuesday this week the Pentagon revealed that it had launched air and drone strikes aimed at killing the head of the Somali Islamist group al-Shabaab, Ahmed Abdi Godane. While it is still unclear whether the operation was successful, it does not mark a major shift in US policy, which has seen the US launch attacks on al-Shabaab in Somalia before. US military action in Somalia is ongoing alongside the the US presence in Afghanistan, the continued drone strikes in Yemen and Pakistan and the recent decision to begin bombing ISIS militants in Iraq. 

YouGov’s latest research shows that many Americans are confused about where, exactly, the US is bombing. Most Americans are aware of the ongoing campaign in Iraq, and people tend to be aware of the strikes in Afghanistan. Less than a quarter of the public are aware that the US has recently launched strikes in Somalia, Pakistan or Yemen. 30% also say, incorrectly, that the US has recently conducted bombings in Syria and only 32% of Americans know that the US has not in fact launched air or drone strikes in Syria. 

Most Americans support conducting air or drone strikes in Iraq (60%), Afghanistan (54%) and Syria (51%). They also tend to support the ongoing drone campaigns in Somalia (45%), Pakistan (45%) and Yemen (38%). They would also tend to approve (38%) rather than disapprove (33%) of conducting drone strikes in Iran. 29% of Americans say that they would approve of the US bombing Gaza and Ukraine. 

The most recent use of US force in Iraq saw American firepower used to assist Iraqi, Kurdish and Shia forces in their offensive against ISIS to lift the siege of Amerli, a town populated by minority Turkmen. 

Full poll results can be found here. (Photo Credit: Screenshot from Lee Camps Redacted Tonight)

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)


pomeranianprivilege:

like both MLK & Mandela were actually considered violent, MLK was assassinated by the US gov & Mandela was imprisoned for 27 years, so no, they are literally not examples of people who were supported by ‘non-violent’ advocates/liberals, they were only accepted & praised by them long after the death of MLK & after apartheid ended in South Africa, and of course only the extremely watered down version of these men are praised by liberals today.

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)


The original Tainted Love recorded by Gloria Jones, famously covered by Soft Cell in the 80’s


g0lden-calamity:

sittinginyourlapandtakingadrag:

gothhabibti:

tourmaline2:

A dress designed to change color in the rain, thanks to dye sewn into 
the seams. Created by Sean Kelly, Modeled by Angelica Guillen-Jimenez

sean is so brilliant honestly 

SEAN!!!!!!

amazing

(via awesomewibblewobble)



We had a lot of trouble with western mental health workers who came here immediately after the genocide and we had to ask some of them to leave.

They came and their practice did not involve being outside in the sun where you begin to feel better. There was no music or drumming to get your blood flowing again. There was no sense that everyone had taken the day off so that the entire community could come together to try to lift you up and bring you back to joy. There was no acknowledgement of the depression as something invasive and external that could actually be cast out again.

Instead they would take people one at a time into these dingy little rooms and have them sit around for an hour or so and talk about bad things that had happened to them. We had to ask them to leave.

~A Rwandan talking to a western writer, Andrew Solomon, about his experience with western mental health and depression.

From The Moth podcast, ‘Notes on an Exorcism’. (via jacobwren)

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)


micdotcom:

A San Diego school district now has an armored truck, because America

This is an MRAP or mine-resistant ambush protected vehicle.
While you’d usually expect to see a vehicle like this in Afghanistan or Iraq, it’s about to become the newest addition to the San Diego Unified School District (SDUSD), reports NPR. The image above is a mock-up of what the MRAP will look like once it’s outfitted and repainted for SDUSD use. But there’s a problem. 
The community doesn’t want it | Follow micdotcom

micdotcom:

A San Diego school district now has an armored truck, because America

This is an MRAP or mine-resistant ambush protected vehicle.

While you’d usually expect to see a vehicle like this in Afghanistan or Iraq, it’s about to become the newest addition to the San Diego Unified School District (SDUSD), reports NPR. The image above is a mock-up of what the MRAP will look like once it’s outfitted and repainted for SDUSD use. But there’s a problem. 

The community doesn’t want it | Follow micdotcom

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)


We’re so obsessed with the ‘90s we brought back the ‘90s

thisisfusion:

On Monday, Coca Cola announced the triumphant return of Surge, a discontinued citrus soda that was apparently sorely missed by fans.

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The company explained in a press release:

SURGE, which debuted in 1996 and taken off the market in the early 2000s, is making a comeback thanks, in part, to a passionate and persistent community of brand loyalists who have been lobbying The Coca-Cola Company to bring back their favorite drink over the last few years.

Our collective desire to go back to the 1990s extends beyond an urge for Surge, however. In fact, we’ve brought so many things back we can stop missing the 1990s altogether. We can relive the 1990s all day, every day, right here in 2014, thanks to these currently available throwbacks:

Tamagotchi

The Tamagotchi — a virtual, digital pet which requires near-constant attention — debuted in Japan in 1996. Since then, several iterations of the device have appeared on the market, but a revamped version of the original returned in earnest to US soil this Fall.

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The game looks more or less the same (it’s larger, but the plastic, egg-shaped shell remains) and has the same premise: don’t let your digital pet digitally die.

Nick Carter

Backstreet’s back, alright! Well, at least one Backstreet, the 1990s heartthrob Nick Carter. The former boy bander is starring in a new reality show, “I Heart Nick Carter,” which premiered last week.

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He’s also going on tour with Jordan Knight. That musical adventure is called “Nick and Knight.”

TV hits about or for children

Lifetime viewers are apparently so ‘90s-crazy that the channel went ahead and made an unauthorized “Saved by the Bell” movie.

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But “Saved by the Bell,” isn’t the only 1990s TV hit that’s making a comeback. “Boy Meets World” spawned decades-late spinoff, “Girl Meets World,” which aired on Disney in June. The Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles are starring in an eponymous film. And Clarissa basically started the explainer trend that has taken the Internet by storm:

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Sexist treatment of Hillary Clinton by the media, others

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When President Bill Clinton was in office, a team of officials feared that, according to Reuters, the First Lady appeared “aloof and calculating.” The president’s then-press secretary recommended Hillary aides show her in a good light to local reporters. “I believe it would create enormous good will for Hillary since we can all tell wonderful Hillary anecdotes that humanize her.” Today, some experts think Chelsea Clinton’s pregnancy could help “humanize” Hillary.

Attention to Olive Garden

Pasta purveyor Olive Garden became hugely popular in the 1990s, when would reasonably have been the last time for us to care about Olive Garden.

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But the chain’s never ending pasta gimmick pulled us right back in — so much so that a nearly-300 page long critique of the company’s strategy has more or less gone viral.

Beyonce

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Flawless since the ’90s. 

Written by Danielle Wiener-Bronner; Edited by Margarita Noriega.


cracked:

We wanted to know what it’s like to deal with schizophrenia on a day-to-day, non-Fight Club basis, so we sat down with a woman who suffers from it.
5 Lies You Probably Believe About My Life With Schizophrenia

#4. Voices Don’t Make You Do Terrible Things
Back when all of this first began, one of the voices started giving me graphic instructions to kill a particularly dickish teacher I had. This troubled me, to say the least. This was before I knew that everyone regarded me as a potential serial killer, so I went to the school counselor, who immediately flipped precisely all of her shit(s). That’s an understandable reaction, but fear of that response is what keeps a lot of mentally ill folk from getting help — it took a lot of pleading to convince her that I wasn’t going to return to school with an Uzi. In fact, the only time I’ve come anywhere close to violence since was the result of a medication called Haldol that I was taking, which causes mood swings. Even then, it was pretty much limited to screaming at my husband to get off my back about the damn dishes.

Read More

cracked:

We wanted to know what it’s like to deal with schizophrenia on a day-to-day, non-Fight Club basis, so we sat down with a woman who suffers from it.

5 Lies You Probably Believe About My Life With Schizophrenia

#4. Voices Don’t Make You Do Terrible Things

Back when all of this first began, one of the voices started giving me graphic instructions to kill a particularly dickish teacher I had. This troubled me, to say the least. This was before I knew that everyone regarded me as a potential serial killer, so I went to the school counselor, who immediately flipped precisely all of her shit(s). That’s an understandable reaction, but fear of that response is what keeps a lot of mentally ill folk from getting help — it took a lot of pleading to convince her that I wasn’t going to return to school with an Uzi. In fact, the only time I’ve come anywhere close to violence since was the result of a medication called Haldol that I was taking, which causes mood swings. Even then, it was pretty much limited to screaming at my husband to get off my back about the damn dishes.

Read More


medievalpoc:

Simon Marmion

Crucifixion of Christ

Netherlands (c. 1450s)

Oil on Wood, 90.6 x 95.3 cm.

Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia

photo credit: Jim The Photographer

(via medievalpoc)