poc-creators:

You should know Aliette De Boudard

This is the home page of Aliette de Bodard, writer of fantasy and science fiction (and the very occasional horror piece). Aliette has won a Nebula Award, a BSFA Award, as well as Writers of the Future. She has also been nominated for the Hugo, Sturgeon, Locus and Campbell Awards.

Her Aztec mystery-fantasies, Servant of the Underworld, Harbinger of the Storm, and Master of the House of Darts, are published by Angry Robot, worldwide.

Her short fiction has appeared in a number of venues, such as Interzone, Clarkesworld Magazine, Asimov’s, and The Year’s Best Science Fiction.

She lives in Paris, France, in a flat with more computers than she really needs, and uses her spare time to indulge in her love of mythology and history–as well as her love of cooking (the recipe page can be found here).

As a Franco-Vietnamese, Aliette has a strong interest in Ancient Vietnam and Ancient China, and will gladly use any excuse to shoehorn those into her short or long fiction.

A more extensive biography is available here, and a list of her fiction can be found here.

In the resources section, you will also find Aliette’s schedule and her list of essays on science, culture, cultural appropriation and other genre-related stuff.

One of my fav of those essays is this: Drawing Inspiration from fantasy further afield:fantasy set in nonwestern cultures

The main goal when starting a piece is to move my default thinking from 21st-century France to, say, 15th-century Mexico, for the duration of writing. I always want to get to the point where it is mostly unconscious: this ensures I don’t need to think about making my characters “feel” Aztec, but can instead focus on their motivations and behaviour as individuals, while being sure that I don’t have them say anything spectacularly wrong (such as, for instance, expressing atheist ideas in a culture where religion remained a bedrock). The problem, I’ve noticed, is my default: when I’m not paying attention, it reverts to what I was raised with (and I think most people are the same. It takes an effort to see things from the perspective of someone else. I’m not saying it’s impossible, just that it’s seldom unconscious). This means that, in the midst of a scene, I can have characters spouting ideas about male and female equality (a superb notion, but a totally anachronistic one); or that my plot twists will suddenly rely on something typically modern such as belief in individual freedom (again, anachronistic for the time period). So I’d rather have a thick layer of period thinking underneath when writing. This involves reading. A lot. I pick primary sources (literature from the time period); secondary sources (scholarly articles, books for the general public); and children’s books (which tend to be sparser on the grander details of history, but a lot more focused on the nitty-gritty details of everyday life, invaluable for a novelist). It’s not always obvious to find such sources: it is way easier to find books about Medieval England than about Ming dynasty China or the Aztecs. But they do exist, and there are also a precious few internet resources which can be looked up online (with the usual caveat on reliability). MORE

(via poc-creators)


fjordism:

AARON PAUL JUST POSTED THIS ON TWITTER AND I’M SHITTING

(via shlabam)


think-progress:

This shocking stat says it all.

think-progress:

This shocking stat says it all.

(via candidlycara)


aleyma:

Howling wolf, made in Southern Siberia, c.500-200 BC (source).

aleyma:

Howling wolf, made in Southern Siberia, c.500-200 BC (source).

(via treyfla)


Magnetically Actuated Micro-Robots for Advanced Manipulation Applications (by SRI International)



planetaryviolet:

How They Make Sex Scenes

This made me laugh for about 100 years

(via heidiviolette)


exquisite-blackness:

Albert Einstein. In 1946, the Nobel Prize-winning physicist traveled to Lincoln University in Pennsylvania, the alma mater of Langston Hughes and Thurgood Marshall and the first school in America to grant college degrees to blacks. At Lincoln, Einstein gave a speech in which he called racism “a disease of white people,” and added, “I do not intend to be quiet about it.” He also received an honorary degree and gave a lecture on relativity to Lincoln students. In fact, many significant details are missing from the numerous studies of Einstein’s life and work, most of them having to do with Einstein’s opposition to racism and his relationships with African Americans. Einstein continued to support progressive causes through the 1950s, when the pressure of anti-Communist witch hunts made it dangerous to do so. Another example of Einstein using his prestige to help a prominent African American occurred in 1951, when the 83-year-old W.E.B. Du Bois, a founder of the NAACP, was indicted by the federal government for failing to register as a “foreign agent” as a consequence of circulating the pro-Soviet Stockholm Peace Petition. Einstein offered to appear as a character witness for Du Bois, which convinced the judge to drop the case. In the wake of the monumental effort to digitize Einstein’s life and genius for the masses, let’s hope that more of us will acknowledge Einstein’s greatness as a champion of human and civil rights for African-Americans as one of his greatest contributions to the world.
Read more at http://www.snopes.com/politics/quotes/einstein.asp#llkyWhUXu9s4PV80.99

“There is … a somber point in the social outlook of Americans … Their sense of equality and human dignity is mainly limited to men of white skins. Even among these there are prejudices of which I as a Jew am dearly conscious; but they are unimportant in comparison with the attitude of ‘Whites’ toward their fellow-citizens of darker complexion, particularly toward Negroes. … The more I feel an American, the more this situation pains me. I can escape the feeling of complicity in it only by speaking out.”    -Albert Einstein

exquisite-blackness:

Albert Einstein. In 1946, the Nobel Prize-winning physicist traveled to Lincoln University in Pennsylvania, the alma mater of Langston Hughes and Thurgood Marshall and the first school in America to grant college degrees to blacks. At Lincoln, Einstein gave a speech in which he called racism “a disease of white people,” and added, “I do not intend to be quiet about it.” He also received an honorary degree and gave a lecture on relativity to Lincoln students. 

In fact, many significant details are missing from the numerous studies of Einstein’s life and work, most of them having to do with Einstein’s opposition to racism and his relationships with African Americans. 

Einstein continued to support progressive causes through the 1950s, when the pressure of anti-Communist witch hunts made it dangerous to do so. Another example of Einstein using his prestige to help a prominent African American occurred in 1951, when the 83-year-old W.E.B. 
Du Bois, a founder of the NAACP, was indicted by the federal government for failing to register as a “foreign agent” as a consequence of circulating the pro-Soviet Stockholm Peace Petition. Einstein offered to appear as a character witness for Du Bois, which convinced the judge to drop the case. 

In the wake of the monumental effort to digitize Einstein’s life and genius for the masses, let’s hope that more of us will acknowledge Einstein’s greatness as a champion of human and civil rights for African-Americans as one of his greatest contributions to the world.

Read more at http://www.snopes.com/politics/quotes/einstein.asp#llkyWhUXu9s4PV80.99

“There is … a somber point in the social outlook of Americans … Their sense of equality and human dignity is mainly limited to men of white skins. Even among these there are prejudices of which I as a Jew am dearly conscious; but they are unimportant in comparison with the attitude of ‘Whites’ toward their fellow-citizens of darker complexion, particularly toward Negroes. … The more I feel an American, the more this situation pains me. I can escape the feeling of complicity in it only by speaking out.”    -Albert Einstein

(via whatwhiteswillneverknow)


Springtime in Boston

Springtime in Boston


pahnem:

vua2:

oh my god

everyone needs to see this video at least once in their life

(via lovenotfadeaway)